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HR: Let your voice be heard!

Louise Gade, the Deputy Director of AU HR, hopes that all members of staff will contribute to the process of psychological workplace assessment. This is the only way to get a true picture of job satisfaction at the university, she says.

A psychological workplace assessment is a fantastic tool at any place of work, says Louise Gade, the Deputy Director of AU HR. She hopes that all members of staff will take this opportunity to let their voices be heard.
“It’s very important that all members of staff complete the questionnaire. This is actually the only way we can get a true and fair picture of job satisfaction at Aarhus University,” she says.

Follow-up is vital

AU HR has been working alongside the Centre for Teaching and Learning throughout the process of psychological workplace assessment; and once the general results are available at the end of February, the HR Department will be responsible for the task of following up.
“Naturally, our services are available to anyone who needs us. We can provide help to resolve conflicts or other forms of departmental difficulty relating to the working environment; and of course we’ll be focusing in particular on any improvements that could be made. But actually it’s just as important to find out what we’re doing right and then try to hang onto our successes and maybe extend them to other parts of the organisation as well,” explains Louise Gade.

Departmental monitoring groups

One of the steps AU HR has taken is to produce a catalogue defining the best way for departments to follow up on the process of psychological workplace assessment; and ever since the last assessment in 2009, HR has also been working to create a more systematic framework and subject-based approach.
“This time we have given much of the responsibility for follow-up to departmental monitoring groups, with the department management and staff continuing the process and conducting departmental discussions. Of course the management is responsible for follow-up in general, but we want everyone to share responsibility for keeping up the good work when things are going right, and for changing things if changes are needed,” concludes Louise Gade.